SURGERY

SURGERY

BRAIN TUMOURS

Brain tumours make up less than 2% of all diagnosed tumours in Australia but are significant because they produce a disproportionate level of disability to the patient and their relatives.

Brain tumours may present with headaches, a seizure or epileptic fit or neurological symptoms including difficulty of speech, motor power, sensation, vision or coordination. In addition brain tumours may be picked up incidentally, when the patient has no symptoms.

Brain tumours may be either primary (arising from the brain itself), secondary (coming from some other location). Tumours may be benign (slow growing) or malignant (fast growing)

Neurosurgeons are the specialists primarily  involved in the investigation and treatment of brain tumours in collaboration with other medical specialists. Further investiagtions may include a MRI scan or scans of other body organs. Treatment typically involves surgery to make a diagnosis and ideally to remove the tumour, completely if possible. Additional or adjuvant therapy, including chemotherapy or radiotherapy, may be necessary depending on the type of the tumour. Your neurosurgeon will discuss your treatment options with you to ensure you get the best treatment.

Brain Tumours
Brain Tumours